il
NOSTRO SALE QUOTIDIANO
RECENSIONI SUPER SANITA’ ANSA.IT STARBENE NEWS FOOD CINQUANTAMILA SCARICA IL LIBRO GRATIS SCEGLI LA VERSIONE ITALIANA INGLESE
il
NOSTRO SALE QUOTIDIANO
il
NOSTRO SALE QUOTIDIANO
il
NOSTRO SALE QUOTIDIANO
il
NOSTRO SALE QUOTIDIANO
Ann Ist Super Sanità 2018 | Vol. 54, No. 1: 72-74 DOI: 10.4415/ANN_17_04_14 Book Reviews, Notes and Comments This book on the planet salt has a subtitle that cer-tainly affects: how to avoid white death. The reduction of salt consumption is the central topic of the proposed text. In fact, according to the latest WHO indications, raised blood pressure is the leading risk factor for the global disease burden and is estimated to cause 9.4 mil-lion deaths every year more than half the estimated 17 million deaths caused by cardiovascular diseases an-nually. The author proposes a very interesting route on all aspects of salt and uses the interview formula to a hy-pothetical patient to highlight the damage caused by excessive consumption of salt in the diet and illustrates the two main mechanisms of salt action on the human body that cause damage to health: stimulation of the sympathetic nervous system induced by salt to produce a greater amount of adrenaline that causes a constric- tion of the arteries and naturally to a greater water retention due to the presence of salt dissolved in the blood which contributes to an increase of blood volume and pressure on arterial walls. High consumption of sodium leads to increases blood pressure, risk of heart disease, stroke, high risk of infec-tion of Helicobacter pylori , gastritis and stomach tumors, increased risk of osteoporosis through loss of calcium in the urine. The indications of the Italian Ministry of Health (which follows the WHO guidelines) suggest that a nor-mal consumption of sodium should be 2 grams per day, equivalent to 5 grams of salt per day: a teaspoon. Sodium is mainly consumed as salt which in the diet can come from processed foods, either because they contain large amounts of salt (such as ready meals, pro-cessed meats like bacon, ham and salami, cheese, salty snack foods and instant noodles, among others) or be-cause they are consumed frequently in large amounts (such as bread and processed cereal products). Salt is also added to food during cooking (bouillon and stock cubes) or at the table (soy sauce, chilli sauce, fish sauce and table salt). Dietary patterns are being transformed by the increasing production of more and more pro-cessed food, rapid urbanization and changing lifestyles. Highly processed foods are becoming increasingly available and affordable. The easiest and most cost-effective way of address-ing this is simple: reduce the amount of salt people eat. Lowering salt consumption is a practical action which can save lives, prevent related diseases. The author explains, for example, that the pasta could be cooked without salt if you add an already salted sea-soning like tuna or if we want to salt the water it could be reduced or eliminated. The easiest advice to follow seems to be not to add salt on foods that already contain it naturally (meat, fish, salad, vegetables, cheese, etc.). The book is accompanied by a list and description of the largest types of salt in the world (with historical, cul-tural, chemical composition and uses) and a small guide to recipes that do not include salt and which helps the reader to introduce the small secrets of counter-cook-ing into daily practice: for example the abundant use of spices, herbs , citrus fruits and vinegar that make food tasty and that offers new culinary paradigms and new tastes for our palate. The chapter dedicated to recipes recommends no salt or a small amount of Himalaja salt. In this regard, perhaps it would be better to indicate a type of salt that does not have excessive costs and at least contains the correct amounts of iodine. In order to reduce salt in the diet a joint action is re-quired which implies more information on the media in general and effectively involving general practitioners. An example could be offered by restaurants could con-tribute to salt reduction by not salting meat and fish in advance but leaving the customer the choice. The Author explains that children also take more sodium than the recommended one that is associated with an increase in pressure becoming a real cardiovas-cular risk factor. Children like adults take the majority of sodium through processed and consumed food away from home. The text integrates the INRAN Guidelines (Italian National Research Institute for Food and Nutrition) that carries out research, information and promotion activities in the field of food and nutrition for the pur-poses of consumer protection and improvement quality of agro-food productions. Following also a summary of the WHO guidelines on salt. One of the targets agreed by WHO Member States is a 30% relative reduction in mean population intake of salt/sodium by 2025. For WHO it is essential that this target is met in order to meet the overall goal of a 25% reduction in premature mortality from NCDs (noncommunicable diseases). The text is not limited only to the scientific and pathological aspects of excessive sodium intake but tries to explain the socio-cultural and sociological mo-tivations that lead the majority of us to consume more salt than necessary and to consider this chemical el-ement as the most precious of all the periodic table. The reader will find really interesting and rich in ideas the cultural path that addresses the history of salt in religions, in music, in the figurative arts, in po-etry, fairy tales, dreams, famous quotes and proverbs. In a civilization so “rich” of salt, to be able to put it any-where and in abundance, we should remember, daily, that the preciousness attributed to the past was due to many aspects but now in the age of consumerism its ex-cessive consumption can lead to serious consequences and death. http://old.iss.it/binary/publ/cont/ANN_18_01_14.pdf